Author Archives: Eddy Ameen

Psych The Vote! Meet 3 Candidates for APAGS Member-at-Large, Membership

psychthevoteWe’re Psyching the Vote for APAGS Member-at-Large, Membership Recruitment and Retention Focus! During the month of April, APAGS members can submit an elections ballot for elections for APAGS chair-elect and four members at large (link contains position descriptions and official bios). Members will get an email with voting instructions on April 1. This post is the third in a series of six between now and March 31 in which candidates voluntarily answer our questions in 200 words or less, to give voters some insight into what they will bring to their prospective positions.

Our question for APAGS Member-at-Large, Membership Recruitment and Retention Focus: 

What is the value of staying a student member of a large umbrella organization like APA, especially when there are many niche organizations one can be part of, and when APA makes many of its member resources freely available to the public?

Roseann Fish Getchell responds: 

fishEach graduate student has the potential to find value in the unique benefits of becoming an APAGS member.  I want to share my own motivations for joining the APA as a graduate student focused on investing in my future as a professional psychologist to reflect how we can all find our own niche.  1. Connection: I have had the opportunity of meeting amazing students who are truly making a difference in their communities across the country. We have shared common interests, goals, and passions within groups like the Advocacy Coordinating Team–I admire them and am encouraged by them every day. 2. Mentorship: The number of students, staff members and psychologists who genuinely care about building the future of our profession is overwhelming. Whether I am meeting a psychologist at a convention/conference, reading an article in an APAGS blog, or connecting with a committee member, the opportunities for mentoring are endless. 3. Leadership: With the help of incredibly supportive APA staff, the majority of APAGS is organized and run by student volunteers who are engaging in dynamic leadership. There are so many ways to get involved! Visit my website, Facebook, and LinkedIn pages for more information!

Keri Frantell responds: 

frantellWhile I think it is incredibly valuable to be involved with niche organizations, being a part of the larger APA organization allows a few unparalleled opportunities: specifically for networking, emphasizing a well-rounded understanding of the field, and offering a chance to learn and share with diverse perspectives. Due to costs, both financially and with time, we often have to choose divisions that support our interest areas carefully. I have many interests outside of my specific division areas that are vital to my identity as a psychologist. Being a part of APA allows me the opportunity to connect with other professionals beyond my few selected niche areas, and to find connections and similarities with people who I otherwise might not ever meet. When conceptualizing ideas, research areas, and even clients, I know that I find it can be easy to become entrenched in a single, familiar area. APA offers a chance to connect with diverse perspectives, increasing my understanding of important issues. I love to connect with others to learn and grow as a professional. Membership in APA allows us to become well-rounded professionals while offering support in connecting to those with similar or dissimilar interests.

Whitney Stubbs responds:

stubbsI was a student member of APA long before becoming active in any real sense. It was not until my first APA conference in 2014 that I truly felt a part of the APA community. I have vivid memories of this conference, particularly my interactions with members of the Division 40 student affiliate organization, ANST. Not only did I feel welcomed and accepted into this new community, I felt inspired and supported. In retrospect, this point marks when my professional identity truly began to develop, and I began to seek out mentorship and professional opportunities to meet my training needs. Being a part of a community of bright, motivated, and passionate individuals has pushed me to grow, both personally and professionally, and has helped me realize that I could truly make a difference within our field. When I reflect on the benefits of membership, particularly active membership, I think about supportive community, personal growth, professional development, and networking. I also think about the diversity of opportunities to connect with like-minded individuals and pursue common goals that aren’t always offered by smaller professional organizations. For me, it is the relational piece, beyond the intellectual, that makes active membership so beneficial.

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Be on the lookout Tuesday, March 29th for our next post in this series and be sure to vote when you receive your APAGS electronic ballot on April 1! — APAGS Staff.

Psych The Vote! Meet 2 Candidates for APAGS Member-at-Large, Practice

psychthevoteWe’re Psyching the Vote for APAGS Member-at-Large, Practice Focus! During the month of April, APAGS members can submit an elections ballot for elections for APAGS chair-elect and four members at large (link contains position descriptions and official bios). Members will get an email with voting instructions on April 1. This post is the second in a series of six between now and March 31 in which candidates voluntarily answer our questions in 200 words or less, to give voters some insight into what they will bring to their prospective positions.

Our question for APAGS Member-at-Large, Practice Focus: 

Right now, APAGS is focused on ending the internship crisis for health service psychology students. What questions or concerns related to psychological practice would you have the committee focus on so that we’re prepared to meet the demands of the field for future generations of trainees?

Stephen Lupe responds: 

lupeCurrently, the field of health service psychology is in a state of transition.  It is expanding in to new and exciting areas such as integrated care.  It is imperative we as an organization plan for this transition.  It should be a priority we develop more training opportunities with a focus on interprofessional collaboration.  The future of psychological practice is going to rely on psychologists’ ability to work collaboratively with professionals from other disciplines.  I will lobby for more grant opportunities for site development.  In addition, it is time we as an organization empower graduate students to advocate for themselves in the areas of expanding practice.  We need to shed many of the past ideas of what practicing psychologist do and empower students to use their skills in new and exciting ways.   APA/APAGS should continue to develop initiatives to expand practice and support the efforts of the next generation of psychologists.  I will push for APA/APAGS to continue to explore emerging areas of practice, develop initiatives to highlight the need for interprofessional collaboration, and develop training opportunities and support funding for these opportunities.

Jerrold Yeo responds:

yeoA couple of questions always on the mind of every health service psychology student: “Will I match?”, “Can I afford it?”. The state of the internship crisis has been improving over the years, but statistics may not mean so much when we are the ones who do not match. As someone who has been unsuccessful in the application process this past year, it has been particularly salient to me. Some of the things we should focus on for students would be ending the internship crisis AND ensuring internships provide affordable stipends. It pains me whenever I see training sites in very expensive locations offering stipends under $25k, which is not affordable for the debt-ridden student. This can be exponentially more difficult for students who are less financially well-off, having to take out substantially more loans to train at an expensive city, or internationally (Canada). I also think that students in health service psychology should have sufficient access to training in integrative healthcare, as collaboration and consultation with healthcare professions are an essential part of today’s practice. Another area to address would be cross-border access (Canada) to internship positions, and the logistics involved in applying for and matching across the countries.

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Be on the look out tomorrow for our next post in this series and be sure to vote when you receive your APAGS electronic ballot on April 1! — APAGS Staff.

Psych The Vote! Meet 2 Candidates for APAGS Chair-Elect

psychthevoteWe’re Psyching the Vote for APAGS Chair-Elect! During the month of April, APAGS members can submit an elections ballot for elections for APAGS Chair-Elect and four members at large (link contains position descriptions and official bios). Members will get an email with voting instructions on April 1. This post is the first in a series of six between now and March 31 in which candidates voluntarily answer our questions in 200 words or less, to give voters some insight into what they will bring to their prospective positions.

Our first question for APAGS Chair-Elect: 

 What competencies should be expected of all psychology graduate students in the areas of leadership and advocacy, if any, by the time they graduate? Why?

Justin Karr responds: 

Justin_Karr_headshot_2015The collective voice of psychologists has never been more important, considering healthcare reform, cuts to behavioral science funding, and the international need for evidence-based mental healthcare services. With these issues ongoing, I feel that all psychology students deserve training in advocacy, helping them build competency on how to enact change at local, state, and national levels. Only then can we advocate together in a way that strengthens our profession, serves the public, and ensures social justice. Psychologists are well-equipped to make meaningful change in the world, but we can only actualize that change with effective leadership. While all students have a role in advocacy, not all students will choose to serve in positions of leadership; however, all students deserve an equal opportunity to pursue leadership training. A culture of leadership has been growing within psychology, as psychologists today lead integrated healthcare teams, head academic institutions, and even serve in Congress. APAGS aims to strengthen this culture of leadership; and as your APAGS Chair-elect, I will advocate for the funding and development of more student leadership training opportunities, ensuring future generations of psychologists are well-prepared to serve as leaders within both our field and the many settings in which they serve.

Blaire Schembari responds:

schembariThe development of leadership and advocacy competencies among graduate students is often ignored. Graduate programs should emphasize the cultivation of these skills. Leadership and advocacy abilities enable students to contribute to the field of psychology and enhance their individual careers, as these roles are a part of many psychology career paths (i.e., therapists advocate for their patients, researchers lead projects and utilize results to advocate for sameness or change, teachers lead and advocate for their students).

There are several competencies I believe psychology graduate students should develop. First, an open-mind is critical to being an effective leader and advocate. Change is more likely to occur if you’re willing to listen to others and make them feel heard, even if they challenge your beliefs. Effective communication is foundational. This includes actively listening and providing constructive feedback to others’. A successful leader and advocate also has the courage to challenge the rules when they are more harmful than helpful. Moreover, being passionate and dedicated to your team and work ensures during difficult times you remain focused. Finally, knowing your limits, setting boundaries, knowing when to delegate, ask for help, and practice self-care are vital to the longevity of a leader and advocate.

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Be on the look out tomorrow for our next post in this series and be sure to vote when you receive your APAGS electronic ballot on April 1! — APAGS Staff.

Many groups are offering students awards and grants to travel to APA Convention Aug. 4-7, 2016 in Denver, Colorado. (Image source: MattHurst on Flicker. Some rights reserved.)

A Comprehensive List of Student Travel Awards to Attend APA’s 2016 Convention

Many groups are offering students awards and grants to travel to APA Convention Aug. 4-7, 2016 in Denver, Colorado. (Image source: MattHurst on Flicker. Some rights reserved.)

Many groups are offering students awards and grants to travel to APA Convention Aug. 4-7, 2016 in Denver, Colorado. (Image source: MattHurst on Flicker. Some rights reserved.)

Let’s face it. You’re eager to travel to APA Convention in Denver, Colorado this August — and we’re eager to meet you! To make the journey less burdensome on your wallet, I compiled a list of travel offerings from across APA’s many departments, committees, divisions, and caucuses, as well as groups outside APA. In some cases, you’ll need to be a presenter, and in other cases, you won’t. This list is meant to complement our other strategies to save.  If you hear of any further opportunities, send details my way, and I’ll update this blog posting. [Last updated: 5/10/16] 

From APA

APAGS: Offers two grants/awards:

  • We’re offering 5-7 students the opportunity to participate in a yearlong leadership institute, which includes $500 in reimbursement to attend APA Convention. Applications due April 1. While this is not a convention travel award — and does come with significant commitment on your part — it is one way we’re hoping to expose students to all the important career leadership and networking opportunities that exist in Denver.
  • A second — albeit indirect — way to obtain up to $500 reimbursement for Convention is to be the one lucky nominator of a faculty member who is selected as the Raymond D. Fowler Awardee for Outstanding Contribution to the Professional Development of Graduate Students.  Applications due April 1.

American Psychological FoundationOffers two grants/awards:

Science DirectorateOffers around 100 Student Travel Awards of $300 each for graduate student travel to present research at APA Convention.  Applications due April 1. In addition, approximately seven students who applied for a travel award will receive an Ungerleider/Zimbardo Travel Scholarship of $300 from the American Psychological Foundation, helping a total of 107 students attend the convention.

Children, Adolescents and Families (CAF) Caucus: Offers two 2016 student travel awards in the amount of $300. Applications due March 31, 2016. Requirements are that: 1) the presentation is relevant to children, adolescents and/or families; and 2) the student is first (or solo) author on the presentation. Applicants are to provide: 1) a copy of their accepted APA presentation; 2) a brief (approximately 250 words) statement regarding their career aspirations; and 3) a letter of recommendation from their advisor or research mentor to the Elections/Communications Chair. Please forward information to Mary A. Fristad, PhD, ABPP at mary.fristad@osumc.edu or 1670 Upham Drive Suite 460G, Columbus, OH 43210-1250 (if mailed, must be received by March 31, 2016).

Commission on Ethnic Minority Recruitment, Retention and Training in Psychology II Task Force: Offers five Travel Grants for Students of Color in Psychology up to $1000 each. Applications due May 15.  The award is to assist students to participate at professional conferences, including APA Convention. If the student is presenting at APA and commits to submitting their presentation for publication, they are eligible. Again, the award is not specifically for convention.

Committee on Socioeconomic Status: Offers one CSES Leadership Award (Student Category), which includes a $500 honorarium.  Applications have been extended to June 1 (and the change will soon appear online — Editor, 4/4/16). There is no requirement that it be used to attend Convention; however, awardees are recognized at Convention.

Office of International Affairs: Offers several awards of up to $500 to psychologists and psychology students based outside the U.S. and Canada, to be applied toward costs related to the APA Convention (e.g., travel expenses or registration fees). Applications due May 1.

From APA Divisions

Division 1, General PsychologyOffers 2 awards valued at $250 each, to Division 1 members. Applications due June 3. The student travel awards are to defray the cost of attending the 2016 Convention. You must be presenting at Convention under Division 1 (note: student does not need to be first author). Must be a student as of Spring 2016. Apply now! Contact Kasey Powers for questions.

Division 2, Society for the Teaching of Psychology: Offers the SAGE Teaching Innovations & Professional Development Award, one student travel grant worth $1,250. Priority application deadline is April 1. The Award is designed to defray costs for a graduate student who wishes to attend the STP (Division 2) programming at Convention. Apply now! Contact Scott Brandhorst for questions.

Division 19, Military PsychologyOffers up to 12 travel awards at $750 each. Applications are due March 31. Apply now! Contact Kevin or Div19studentrep@gmail.com  (all three student reps have access to this email account and can answer questions).

Division 35, Society for the Psychology of Women:  The Division’s Section IV (Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Concerns) Graduate Student Committee offers one travel award of $250. Applications due May 1. Priority will be given to applicants with accepted proposals to present at Convention and those demonstrating a commitment to work with LGBTQ populations from a feminist perspective through research, practice, teaching, and/or community involvement. Apply with a 2-3 page abbreviated CV; a one-page letter of recommendation from an advisor or someone otherwise in a position to speak on the applicant’s commitment to working with LGBTQ populations from a feminist perspective; if presenting, documentation of proposal acceptance; and a two-page personal statement addressing how attending convention will benefit your professional development and goals in relation to LGBTQ feminist psychology (Please include in your statement a brief discussion of your need for funding in order to attend APA Convention, and the lack of alternative funding sources to support conference travel). Submit application as one document via email to Mary T. Guerrant, Chair of the Section IV Graduate Student Committee.

Division 44, Society for the Psychological Study of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Issues: Offers a number of awards.

  • There will be 2 Dr. Richard A. Rodriguez Division 44 Student Travel Awards valued at $500 each. The award supports engagement with LGBT people of color by defraying travel cost.  Applications due May 25. Download the 2016 application form.
  • There will be 2 Mentoring Student Travel Awards at $500 each to support graduate student engagement with LGBTQ psychology. Applications due May 1.
  • There will be 13 “APA Division 44 Student and Early Career Psychologist Engagement Awards” of $250 each. Applications due May 2016 (exact date TBD). Recipients will be required to attend Convention and volunteer in the Division 44 suite for several hours. Applicants must be either (1) a student who is enrolled for the 2016-2017 academic year; or (2) an early career psychologist who completed a psychology training program within the last three years. All applicants must also be members of Division 44. Applicants will be notified of the status of their application via email by the end of June. Submit a cover letter, application form, and CV. Application form will collect contact information, presentation information (if applicable), past attendance to APA (if applicable), past experience with Div. 44 (if applicable), and, for students, their 2016-17 school, program, degree, and year. Your cover letter should provide a description of professional goals and how attending the conference will further these goals, especially as it relates to the research and practice of LGBT concerns in psychology. Application materials must be completed and submitted electronically to Skyler Jackson and Dawn Brown by the May deadline (TBD) in order to be considered.

Division 45, Society for the Psychological Study of Culture, Ethnicity, and RaceOffers 5 Student Travel Awards at $500 each to help assist with the cost of attending APA Convention. Applications due May 31, including a recommendation letter from your advisor or mentor Accepting the travel award commits the students to attending the entire Convention. You must be a current member of the Division. Consideration will be given to those students who demonstrate the following: Leadership Experience; Conference, Presentations, and Symposiums; Publications; Public Service and Community Activities; and Awards and Scholarships. Contact Division 45 with questions.

Division 49, Society for Group Psychology and Group Psychotherapy: Offers 6 student travel awards at $500 each to members. Applications due April 15. View this info sheet (PDF) for details.

Division 54, Society of Pediatric Psychology: Offers 5 student travel awards of $750 each. Applications due May 31.  The student travel award is available exclusively for travel to APA Convention.  Awards are available for graduate students, pre-doctoral interns, and post-doctoral fellows who are members of the Society of Pediatric Psychology and who are the first author of a poster or paper to be presented during Division 54 programming at the APA Convention this year. To apply, please submit the following as one complete PDF document to Dr. Eleanor Mackey at emackey@childrensnational.org: (1) a one- page cover letter including your name and e-mail address, your current training institution, your primary mentor on this submitted project, a statement confirming your Division 54 membership status, and information on any other sources of travel funding for your convention participation; (2) copy of your original proposal submitted for the APA conference; and, (3) your current curriculum vitae. Contact Dr. Eleanor Mackey with questions.

Division 56, Trauma Psychology:  Offers a $500 “International Student Travel Assistance Stipend.” Applications due May 1. The travel assistance stipend consists of $500 plus registration fee for the 2016 APA Convention, and is for international students enrolled in a graduate program in psychology, who are citizens of and live and study in developing countries or are citizens from developing countries studying in the U. S. and who will be presenting a trauma related poster, paper, symposium participant at the 2016 APA convention. Also included is a one year free membership in the Division of Trauma Psychology (Div. 56). This stipend is intended as partial support and matching grants or additional support from other institutions and organizations are also encouraged. Send a copy of your CV and proposal abstract that was accepted for the APA convention to: Elizabeth Carll, PhD, President-Elect of APA Trauma Psychology Division, and Chair of Div 56 International Committee, ecarll@optonline.net.

From Elsewhere

Psi Chi: Offers two awards.

  • The Edwin B. Newman Graduate Research Award provides one student with $1,200 in cash from Psi Chi and $1,500 in travel reimbursement from APA to Attend APA Convention. Applications were due February 1; keep this in mind for next year!
  • Unrestricted Travel Grants of up $1500 for up to 17 graduate students who are Psi Chi members. Apply for the funds before or after presenting at a conference such as APA Convention. Applications are due in early May.

 

Important notice to users of MyPsychTrack

APAGS recently heard about a change to the MyPsychTrack (MPT) system that could create confusion and lost data. MPT is changing to a new and improved portal (https://app.mypsychtrack.com/) on March 4th, 2016. If you are a student tracking clinical training hours on MPT, unless you logged in recently to record hours, you may be unaware of this change. To maintain all your data, you have to upload your data to the new portal by March 4th. Data logged on the old portal may not be available on or after March 4th.

There is a link on the MPT homepage that provides assistance on transferring hours into the new system. Contact MPT support if you have any questions or concerns and they will walk you through the process.

APPIC believes this will affect about 200 people who haven’t updated their MPT account since March 2015.

Please share this widely with your peers, and of course, it’s always a good practice to back up your data regardless of the system you use!